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Govt to finance $258m Melling interchange, plus more rail network improvements

Wellington.Scoop
The Government’s upgrade programme announced today includes $258million for a new Melling interchange, and $211million for improvements to the Wellington, Wairarapa and Palmerston North rail network, including upgraded tracks for the Wairarapa and Capital Connection lines, safety connections and refurbishment of Capital Connection carriages. Read more »

“Fantastic:” Hutt mayor welcomes new Melling interchange

News from Hutt City Council
Lower Hutt Mayor Campbell Barry has welcomed today’s news the Government will fund a new Melling Interchange near central Lower Hutt, to be completed by 2026. Read more »

Melling interchange construction will unlock flood protection plan

News from Greater Wellington Regional Council
The Regional Council welcomes the announcement of funding for Lower Hutt’s Melling Interchange, announced today as part of the Government’s infrastructure funding package, saying it will unlock the full potential of the critical RiverLink flood protection scheme. Read more »

Daran Ponter wants hybrid trains for Kāpiti and Wairarapa commuters

Press Release – Greater Wellington Regional Council
Regional Council chair Daran Ponter says the $1.35bn infrastructure announcement by government today is a good boost for the region, a solid green light for getting regional passenger rail moving and that the next stop would be securing a funding package for hybrid trains. Read more »

Kāpiti councillor laments failure to extend commuter rail to Otaki

Media release from Gwynn Compton
Kāpiti Coast commuter rail campaigner Gwynn Compton has welcomed the Government’s announcement of funding for the Ōtaki to north of Levin expressway, but says the lack of any investment or accelerated timeline for the double tracking and electrification of the rail network from Waikanae to Ōtaki, or even for new hybrid train units for the Capital Connection service, is a missed opportunity and shows the Government isn’t serious about its commitment to better transport infrastructure or addressing climate change. Read more »

More spending on roads is great for Kāpiti, says mayor

Press Release – Kapiti Coast District Council
The confirmation of large scale infrastructure investment in the lower North Island will boost connectivity and resilience in the region, Kāpiti Coast District Mayor K Gurunathan says. Read more »

John Milford wants more money for Wellington roads

Press Release – Wellington Chamber Of Commerce
The Government’s announcement of a $12 billion spend up on new infrastructure projects is bypassing our capital city, according to the Wellington Chamber of Commerce. Read more »

Real-scale model of Shelly Bay development for two-week public consultation

News from Shelly Bay Taikuru Development
Wellingtonians will be able to walk along a section of a real-scale model of the planned development at Shelly Bay, when the doors open for two weeks of onsite engagement at The Lodge today. The model waterfront road and pavement, complete with real-scale vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians, is one of a number of devices that visitors will be able to use as a way to engage with the planned development, before providing feedback. Read more »

Differences of opinion at hui about Shelly Bay development

Report from RNZ by Rachel Thomas
A hui about the controversial housing development at Wellington’s Shelly Bay has so far failed to win over iwi members who oppose the plan. Read more »

Fatal for dogs – poisonous algae intensifying in all regional rivers

News from Greater Wellington Regional Council
Toxic algae is quickly intensifying throughout the region, with all monitored rivers reaching health alert levels and Wairarapa’s Waipoua River remaining hazardous for swimmers.

Otaki, Waikanae, Hutt, Ruamahanga and Waingawa river monitoring sites have exceeded the 20 per cent alert threshold, and the Waipoua River is above the 50 per cent “no swimming” line. Detached mats, which are particularly hazardous for dogs, have been seen in all rivers.

It is highly likely the same conditions apply to many non-monitored rivers in other parts of the region, so it would be useful for people visiting rivers to know what toxic algae looks like so that it can be avoided.

“Our message is clear. People should stay out of the Waipoua River and remain vigilant in other rivers,” says Greater Wellington Senior Environmental Scientist Dr Mark Heath.

“Levels are expected to increase, with hot dry conditions forecast for much of the region throughout next week.

“This comes on top of a prolonged dry spell. With the exception of the Otaki River, it’s been 35 days since the last decent flush for most rivers and streams in the region, which has produced ideal conditions for the growth of toxic algae.”

Warnings are being placed on the rivers shown below, and a range of media is being used to inform the public of risk levels around rivers.

Specific site warnings are:
• Otaki River, warning extends from State Highway 1 bridge to river mouth
• Waikanae River, warning extends from Main Rd (old SH1) to river mouth
• Hutt River, warnings for Melling and Siverstream sites
• Waingawa River, warning for south road site
• Ruamahanga River, warning for Morrisons bush site
• Waipoua River, warning extends from Paierau Road to confluence with the Ruamahanga

Toxic algae grows on submerged river stones, presenting with a shiny brown/dark green to violet coating. It can also become unstable and detach, floating to the surface forming small brown/black mats at the water’s edge.

Given conditions quickly change, people should be remain vigilant around rivers and streams throughout the region. This is the prime season for toxic algae, so look out for algae covering rocks and for detached mats in the water and lining riverbanks. If in doubt, stay out of the water and keep a close eye on children and dogs,

It is important to keep an eye on babies and toddlers who may put objects in their mouths. Seek emergency medical attention immediately if anyone in your group swallows toxic algae.

See your doctor or contact Healthline 0800 611116 if you have been in contact with toxic algae and develop the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, numbness, tingling, muscle twitches, shaking, weakness. Get urgent medical attention for anyone with breathing difficulties, convulsions or loss of consciousness.

Before you swim, stay safe by finding out about toxic algae at http://www.gw.govt.nz/safeswim/.

For more information on where it is safe to swim, go to: https://www.lawa.org.nz/explore-data/swimming/

News from Hutt City Council – January 24
Hot weather and low rainfall have combined to increase the risk of toxic algae with parts of the Hutt River now over the limit for safe swimming. Toxic algae has been found at the Silverstream monitoring site.

It grows on submerged river stones, presenting with a shiny brown/dark green to violet coating. It can also become unstable and detach, floating to the surface forming small brown/black mats at the water’s edge.

It is important to keep an eye on babies and toddlers who may put objects in their mouths. Seek emergency medical attention immediately if anyone in your group swallows toxic algae.

Caution should also be taken when exercising dogs by rivers as they are strongly attracted to the musty smell of drying mats and will eat them where they can, which could be fatal.

Given the rapid growth of toxic algae and its potential change in coverage between weekly monitoring points people are also urged to know what it looks like. They should check information signs around popular swimming areas.

News from Wellington Regional Council
Toxic algae has been found at a number of sites throughout the region and people should pick their swimming and dog walking spots carefully to avoid the risk to health from contact with the algae.

Monitoring by the Regional Council has found that levels of toxic algae are likely to continue to rise in the face of warm weather forecast for parts of the region over the coming week.

Key places to avoid are: the Waipoua River, where there is an extensive bloom and detached mats of algae; and the Waikanae River, where the Jim Cook Park monitoring site shows some detached mats.

Warning signs remain in place at the Waipoua and Waikanae rivers and people are strongly advised to avoid the Waipoua River where toxic algae and detached mats are widespread.

Levels are also rising on the Hutt River and swimming should be avoided at Silverstream. People should exercise caution at other points along the river and look out for evidence of toxic algae.

Toxic algae grows on submerged river stones, presenting with a shiny brown/dark green to violet coating. It can also become unstable and detach, floating to the surface forming small brown/black mats at the water’s edge.

It is important to keep an eye on babies and toddlers who may put objects in their mouths. Seek emergency medical attention immediately if anyone in your group swallows toxic algae.

If you have been swimming in a river or lake and you have any of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, numbness, tingling, muscle twitches, shaking, weakness, breathing difficulties and potentially convulsions and loss of consciousness see your doctor immediately.

Caution should also be taken when exercising dogs by rivers as they are strongly attracted to the musty smell of drying mats and will eat them where they can, which could be fatal.

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