Archive for the 'Article' Category

Runway extension: less than three weeks for submissions to Environment Court

extension 2

by Sea Rotmann
We have less than three weeks for submissions to the Environment Court opposing Wellington Airport’s proposed runway extension into Cook Strait. Read more »

Why students should get discounted fares

by Paul Bruce
Wellingtonians love our city. Now we are going to make it even better with one ticket for all services, smarter capped weekly and daily fares, and the youth 50% discount extending to tertiary students. Read more »

A vote of no confidence?

by PCGM
Today’s announcement that Andy Foster is joining the ranks of disaffected councillors seeking the mayoralty has underlined how bad things have become at the Wellington City Council – it’s become a free-for-all to displace Celia Wade-Brown. Read more »

Mayoral election race – a launch, IT competitiveness, a change of heart

by PCGM
Congratulations, Wellington – we’ve managed to get through a week of the mayoral election campaign without the Island Bay Cycleway being mentioned once, which makes a refreshing change. Instead, we had Nick Leggett’s full-noise campaign launch, more duelling press releases from Justin Lester and Jo Coughlan, a change of heart from Nicola Young, plus council veteran Helene Ritchie throwing her hat into the ring. Let’s dive right in. Read more »

Deadline expiring, but Miramar’s parking problems continue

by PCGM
Miramar has a parking problem – thanks in large part to Wellington International Airport, in which the city council is a major shareholder. In an attempt to avoid the outrageous parking fees at the airport, motorists have taken to cluttering Miramar streets, leaving little-to-no legal parking for residents. Read more »

Dreams of what could be, vs real life at the Lambton Quay interchange

by Dave McArthur
Two Fridays ago as I travelled from Upper Hutt to my home in Houghton Bay I noted the Hutt motorway was surprisingly empty and every couple of minutes yet another passenger train flashed past my window going north on one of the new rail tracks now sited on a redundant car lane. Read more »

Point-scoring, or back-stabbing?

by PCGM
According to the Taxpayers’ Union, parliamentary resources are being diverted by the Labour Party to aid Justin Lester’s mayoral campaign. Read more »

Five priorities for the region’s environment

by Dr Roger Blakeley
We need some bold, workable ideas to tackle the environmental issues in the Wellington region. Read more »

The Town Hall scandal continues

by Helene Ritchie
A year ago I wrote about my concerns that work hadn’t started on strengthening the Wellington Town Hall. Since then the City Council suddenly found $134million (plus) for a convention centre (capacity the same as the Town Hall), and for a significant ratepayer contribution to a private company for a movie museum (all to be finally approved next month.). Yet the Town Hall strengthening has again been delayed for at least another year. Read more »

This year or next year or sometime or … the Town Hall disgrace

hall town

by Lindsay Shelton
Nicola Young was correct yesterday when she said “it’s a disgrace” that work hasn’t begun on strengthening the Town Hall. It was a reminder that the mayor has stated the work will begin in the current financial year. But the mayoral statement may not be correct. Read more »

The mayoral race. Why vote: part two. What’s in it for me?

by PCGM
Local body elections are a funny old business. Despite the importance of councils in our lives – they manage the local roads, the water supply, whether the rubbish gets picked up on time, making sure the toilets flush, and a whole bunch more – they’ve been increasingly emasculated by central government. So given the tight legislative constraints, council business can be pretty boring, which is probably reflected in the low election turnouts. Yet there’s still a reason to pick up the marker pen and the ballot paper: but to do so, we need to answer the question, what’s in it for me – apart from the provision of basic services. Read more »

Another expert tells why we should be keeping our trolley buses

bus troilley

by Lindsay Shelton
A second expert last week gave more reasons why the Regional Council is wrong to scrap Wellington’s trolley buses. Adding his 55 page report to research from last December, the case for keeping the trolley buses seems undeniable. However the Regional Council continues to be in denial. Read more »

The cost of rising sea levels

New sea walls on the Wellington coastline. Breaker Bay.  Photo by Mark Coote.
New sea walls on the Wellington coastline. Breaker Bay. Photo by Mark Coote.

by Sarah Free
A recent Wellington City Council news release highlights that in the last three years around $4 million has been spent on sea walls at Shelly, Princess, Karaka, Island and Breaker Bays, plus there have been numerous smaller sea wall and road repairs around the southern and eastern coasts. Read more »

Pedestrians, pests and kiwis – Nicola tops our first election scorecard

Lquay
Stantialls Studio Ltd

by PCGM
A burst of campaign announcements and histrionics this week are begging – just begging – to be analysed and pondered over. Pedestrians! Pests! Kiwis! Electioneering! So read on for the latest dispatch from the rapidly-heating-up Wellington mayoral campaign trail. Read more »

Collective responsibility?

by PCGM
The Dominion Post headlined last Friday’s paper with an admission from Celia Wade-Brown that “her council’s handling of the controversial Island Bay cycleway project was a mistake.” This may not have come as a complete surprise to regular wellington.scoop readers, where debate about the contentious project has raged for more than a year. However, the claim from the mayor that this was a “collective mistake” might be news to our readers – as well as to some of her councillors. Read more »

Who will prevail in the mayoral race? Part six: why vote?

by PCGM
A regular occurrence in the wellington.scoop comments is the criticism of local politics – “don’t vote, it only encourages them.” Or in a (marginally) less cynical form, why bother voting when the incumbent and the aspirants seem almost identical? So this week we’re grappling with the existential issues about why you should go to the effort of filling in the ballot paper. Read more »

Frank Kitts Park: the ampitheatre should stay, the Chinese garden should move

by Patrick McCombs
Waterfront Watch has lodged an objection against the Wellington City Council’s resource consent application to redevelop Frank Kitts Park on the waterfront. Our opposition primarily relates to the removal of the amphitheatre, and the location of the proposed Chinese Garden. Read more »

10,000 voices saying what we want … and what we don’t want

by Lindsay Shelton
Can 10,000 people really influence the planning of Wellington’s roads and public transport? Let’s hope that they can, as the “letsgetwellymoving” process is certainly a better one than the seven years when the Transport Agency tried unsuccessfully to dictate what it wanted, ignoring the public and threatening the city council. Read more »

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