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Five years on: the transformation of Victoria Street

Evelyn Page expressionist painting St Peter's Church and Wellington 1954-1
Evelyn Page – Wellington 1954

by Gregor Thompson
On Friday the 7th of August in 2015, a ceremony celebrating the completion of Wellington’s Victoria Street Transformation was held; among the participants, a not-yet-political Peter Jackson welcomed the development. The city council incentive was to encourage growth in an area that wasn’t achieving its potential. Read more »

Why the Spatial Plan is wrong

by William Guest for the Karori Residents Association
The Draft Spatial Plan is hopelessly inadequate for citizens to accept, as they have not been properly consulted over its reasoning or its likelihood of success. Much more information is required for informed opinions to lead to good decisions. Read more »

MRT, and density well done

fit's light rail route may 2019.PNG

by Sam Donald
FIT (Fair Intelligent Transition) Wellington believes that the key to how the city allows for increases in its population will be decisions about Mass Rapid Transit (MRT): this will be the major determinant for the design of the Golden Mile and the final Spatial Plan for Wellington City and its suburbs. Read more »

Missed communication

by Lindsay Shelton
When the Wellington City Council asked us to comment on its new Spatial Plan, it told us the city’s population was going to increase by between 50,000 and 80,000 people over the next thirty years. This led to a great debate about adding blocks of apartments in inner city heritage areas alongside character homes. But towards the end of the consultation period, the council quietly released information that indicated all that debate may not have been necessary. Read more »

It’s agreed – where high rise apartments shouldn’t be built

by Lindsay Shelton
I agree with Guy Marriage when he opposes plans that would allow high-rise apartment buildings in narrow central city streets. Read more »

Diversity as well as height

by Conor Hill
In light of the debate around allowing buildings up to 6 storeys high in some areas of Wellington, it’s worth looking at developments in the only part of suburban Wellington where you can currently build up to (and above) this height. Read more »

Left against left – but there’s common ground

Angus view from
Rita Angus: View from Tinakori Road (1967) from Hocken Library

by Ben Schrader
The other day on RNZ, Mt Cook resident and political commentator Richard Harman made the observation that the Wellington Draft District Plan (DSP) debate had pitched the ‘Boomer Left against the Millenial Left.’ He saw it as a battle between Boomer NIMBYs wanting to protect their picturesque villas from six-storey apartments and Millenial YIMBYs wanting modern and affordable central city housing. Read more »

A sad dad in Berhampore

by James Barber
When this government ruled out a capital gain tax in 2019, I was in tears the next day. We had moved three times to three different flats in Newtown in the two and a half years my daughter had been alive and it felt as though an underclass was developing, a generation which would be stuck in rental housing their entire lives. Read more »

Adversarial, when we need consensus

by Helene Ritchie
Thank goodness for people like the Hanley-Kemble-Welches, Ben Schrader, Sue Elliott, Isla Stewart and A City for People, and all Wellingtonians prepared to give their time and expertise to express concerns, rage, and propose different proposals to the Wellington City Council’s Spatial Plan. And thanks to Wellington.Scoop for making the space for intelligent debate. Read more »

Last to zero?

first to zero

by Benoit Pette
In August last year, the Wellington City Council declared a climate emergency, and released a blueprint outlining intentions and objectives to make the city carbon neutral by 2050. With a 30 year horizon, it was hard to get past the irony of the program name “Te Atakura, First to Zero.” Hopefully, by then, Wellington will not be first to zero, as many cities will have reached that goal much earlier. But it was a start, and intentions were clearly laid out. Read more »

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