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Planning for 2043: city planners to talk about strategic work

News from Inner City Wellington
This year we’ll be hosting a series of events focusing on the development of healthy, vibrant, resilient communities within the inner city. These will provide opportunities for sharing information, discussion and debate on what our inner city could look like given the current and future challenges of population growth, housing shortages, transport developments, community resilience, changing sea and climate conditions and seismicity.

First up we have 3 speakers from Wellington City Council who will tell us about their work as they plan towards 2043. They’ll share with us the council’s strategic and regulatory role and how we as residents, property owners, businesses and organisations can interact and influence within that.

When: Thursday 8 March, 6:00 – 7:30 pm
Where: CQ Hotel, 223 Cuba St, Wellington

Book your seat here.

Speakers:

David Chick, Chief City Planner
How council is developing the urban design strategic direction for the inner city.

Halley Wiseman, Manager, Resource Consents
How the resource consent process is applied to inner-city developments and neighbouring properties.

Anna Harley, Manager, City Design & Place Planning
How building design needs to change to support the development of community resilience, particularly in vertical residential communities.

There will be plenty of time for questions so tell us what you’d like to know and we’ll collate your questions for the speakers to answer. Everyone welcome

1 comment:

  1. michael, 19. February 2018, 19:08

    Good on you Inner City Wellington – you are actively trying to do something towards making our city a better place to live in. If it is left up to the developers (and the council’s lack of decent guidelines) countless apartment blocks will be built that will not facilitate the development of healthy resilient communities. Instead, we will be faced by mental and social issues resulting from poorly designed, over-crowded apartments, which are now confronting many cities around the world.