Wellington Scoop
Network

Wellington rates to increase 3.8% a year in ten-year plan, approved by councillors

News from Wellington City Council
The Wellington City Council’s 10-Year Plan is ready for adoption, after the Mayor and Councillors passed the proposed plan at today’s deliberation session.

Mayor Justin Lester says the plan reaffirms the Council’s commitment to delivering for Wellingtonians.

“The 10-Year Plan gives us the mandate to move ahead on our plans for resilience, housing, transport, a sustainable economy and the creative and cultural sector,” he says.

Wellingtonians will welcome the news that the city’s rates increase, which was originally proposed at 4.5 percent, has come down to an average increase of 3.8 percent a year over the 10 years.

The Mayor says officers have worked hard to trim the fat and find alternative avenues of funding, despite cost increases around insurance.

“For example, the New Zealand Transport Agency has increased its cap on funding, which means a net gain for us of about $2 million a year,” says the Mayor.

The Long-Term and Annual Plan Committee on Wednesday agreed the council should adopt the Long-Term Annual Plan following a consultation process that attracted more than 2000 public submissions.

The 10-Year Plan has strong public support – 72 percent of 2066 submissions agreed with the Council’s vision for Wellington.

The city’s future was also strongly represented with 19-30-year-olds making up 25 percent of submitters, despite being just 19 percent of the city’s population. Nearly 50 percent of submitters were aged 40 or under.

The plan involves investing $2.31 billion in capital projects to ensure Wellington remains safe, inclusive, creative, sustainable and future focused. Key projects are:

• $280m will be spent on on improving key transport corridors, wastewater and water infrastructure.
• $118.5m to protect the water supply, including building 22 community water stations across Wellington.
• Building Wellington’s largest reservoir, holding 35 million litres of water, under Omāroro Park in Mt Cook.
• Further investing in social and affordable housing.
• $122m to partner with NZ Transport Agency and Greater Wellington Regional Council to transform Wellington’s transport infrastructure.
• Our plans include light rail from the CBD to southern and eastern suburbs, prioritisation for walking and cycling, and removing arterial routes from city streets.
• Reinforcing the Culture Capital with $16m budgeted for major cultural events such as WOW, Wellington on a Plate, the New Zealand Festival and Matariki.
• $111m for cultural venues to ensure their ongoing future and enhance their accessibility for artists.

The 10-Year Plan will be adopted at the full Council meeting on June 27.

Content Sourced from scoop.co.nz
Original url

8 comments:

  1. Andrew, 6. June 2018, 19:07

    So my current rates of $2700 will go by $1200 over the next ten years, excluding increases caused by CV revaluations. Has the fat of the conference centre been trimmed by the WCC?

     
  2. greenwelly, 6. June 2018, 19:38

    @Andrew, Dont worry about 10 years time. This will all be reviewed again in 3 years and all the projections will change and depending on what the council then want to do, they will add even more things to the rates bill.

     
  3. Citizen Joe, 6. June 2018, 22:21

    The WCC rates rise is double inflation – need I say more?

     
  4. Michael Gibson, 7. June 2018, 9:47

    If you’re being paid a huge sum to prepare this sort of claptrap then you can well produce the drivel that “Wellingtonians will welcome the news that the city’s rates increase ……. has come down to an average increase of 3.8 percent a year over the 10 years.” Many thanks to Andrew who has worked out that this is an increase of $1200 for somebody now paying $2700 – nearly 50% increase!
    (Congratulations to Nicola Willis who seems to be the only one objecting to a huge increase in fares.)

     
  5. Keith Flinders, 7. June 2018, 15:26

    Has the Film Museum vanity project been dropped ? A privately developed and privately run conference centre and hotel is what Wellington is lacking. Keep the WCC and their lack of business acumen a million miles away from it.

    Rates: I moved into this current house in late 2004, rates have increased 89.4% with this current announcement, 6.35% yearly average.
    Minimum statutory hourly wage has gone from $8.50 to $16.50, so 94% in same period. Still an inadequate rate.
    Average hourly wage increased from $20.21 to $31.03 or 53.5% in same period, according https://tradingeconomics.com/new-zealand/wages
    General Retirement income went up 2.8% this year, so pensioners also have to forgo yet more to afford their rates. No doubt renters on fixed or low incomes will get to pay more too through their landlords.

     
  6. Jonny Utzone, 8. June 2018, 17:31

    Keith – only tourists will be able to afford to go to the Film Museum. Locals will be struggling to pay their ever increasing rates bill.

     
  7. michael, 8. June 2018, 17:53

    I wonder how many of the submitters to the 10 year plan are ratepayers? It is all very well asking what Wellingtonians want but it is all too easy for those not footing the bill to allow the WCC to spend up large, after all it is not their money. I bet if only ratepayers were allowed to vote they wouldn’t be that happy with the results.

     
  8. syrahnose, 9. June 2018, 2:45

    ‘The city’s future was also strongly represented with 19-30-year-olds making up 25 percent of submitters, despite being just 19 percent of the city’s population. Nearly 50 percent of submitters were aged 40 or under.’ This quote shows a pride in low representation of who is footing the bill.