Wellington Scoop
Network

Roadworks outside Te Papa cause queues of traffic back to Ngauranga

Wellington.Scoop
Roadworks on Cable Street outside Te Papa caused traffic delays for an hour this morning, not only on Aotea Quay but also on the motorway. At 8.55, NZTA advised that vehicles heading into the city were queued back to the Ngauranga interchange.

An hour later, NZTA advised that the congestion had eased, but it warned that the roadworks would be continuing till the end of the month.

When the roadworks were announced last month, the WCC said: We want to thank the public for their patience and apologise in advance for any inconvenience.

News from Wellington City Council – December 31
During January and February there will be weekday road works on Cable Street and Wakefield Street to connect utility services to the Tākina Wellington Convention and Exhibition Centre.

The works, including water, power, wastewater and stormwater connections, will involve lane closures on weekdays and are planned over two stages:

Stage One:
Cable Street Works: 5 January – 29 January 2021, weekdays only, 24 hour site

The works will involve some trenching across the Cable Street road and footpath, and Cable Street will be down to one lane during the works to enable safe trenching and pipe installation.
The lanes will be opened up Saturdays and Sundays

Stage Two:
Wakefield Street Works: 1 – 27 February 2021 9am – 4pm, weekdays only

The works will involve some trenching across the Cable Street road and footpath, and Cable St will be down to one lane during the works to enable safe trenching and pipe installation.

The lanes will be reinstalled every weekday after 4pm and in the weekends.

A traffic management plan with Wellington City Council’s traffic team will be in place prior to works starting for both phases.

There will be lane restrictions and diversions during the road works, which will increase traffic on the remaining lanes. Information about lane closures will be managed through radio and social media at the start of the works and throughout the works period. There will also be large traffic signs throughout the central city to manage traffic and to alert road users of diversions.

We will maintain access for vehicle and other road user and pedestrians to neighbouring buildings for residents and businesses.

We want to thank the public for their patience and apologise in advance for any inconvenience.

Tākina Wellington Convention Centre – Next steps

Work on the Tākina Wellington Convention Centre is progressing well. Since completing the piling work and installation of the base isolators, contractors have focused on the installation of the steel structure which is now visible from street view.

In the next 3-6 months there will be continued work on the steel structure and concreting of floors as well as the installation of the façade canopies. Once this stage has been completed, paint work throughout the building will start, and preparation for services will be installed. We are on track for completion of the Centre in 2023.

7 comments:

  1. Codger, 18. January 2021, 11:24

    Another thumbs-down for the convention centre.

     
  2. Toni, 18. January 2021, 19:40

    Why on earth didn’t they do this over the Christmas break when the city was quiet. Guess they didn’t want to upset the workers’ and developer’s holidays? Wonder if they are fixing any old infrastructure while they are at it?

     
  3. Harold Rodd, 19. January 2021, 9:49

    “Fixing!??” Or wrecking?

     
  4. Keith Flinders, 19. January 2021, 14:13

    More meaningless and insincere apologies from organisations who seem incapable of minimising the impact upon the Wellington economy of prolonged road lane closures. This combined with the slowest contractors in NZ being given free reign to take as long as they want projects to take. A classic example being the cycle way at Point Jerningham, about 300 metres in length, that took the best part of two years to complete.

    Cable and Wakefield Streets are busy vital arterial routes, so disruptive work should be done late night/early morning as other cities do.

     
  5. Concerned Wellingtonian, 19. January 2021, 14:42

    Having somebody called “City Engineer” might slightly make up for WCC’s other failings. If there was a City Engineer’s Report presented at a monthly Committee meeting, this might make councillors wake up a bit about what they should be doing.

     
  6. Alan, 20. January 2021, 9:36

    Welcome to New Zealand; once a country of 50 million sheep but now a land of (at least) 50 million traffic cones?

     
  7. D'Esterre, 20. January 2021, 10:56

    Concerned Wellingtonian: “Having somebody called “City Engineer”….” As we used to have, oh gladsome days of yore! The loss of chief engineers at Councils is another “you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone” consequence of the reorganisation and reforms of local authorities from the late 1980s onward.