Treaty of Waitangi to be moved from Archives to National Library

News from NZ Government
Internal Affairs Minister Chris Tremain confirmed today that New Zealand’s founding document, the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi, will be moved from its current home in the Archives New Zealand building to the newly refurbished National Library building in Wellington.

The nine Tiriti o Waitangi sheets have been on permanent display in the Constitution Suite at the Archives New Zealand building on Mulgrave Street since 1991, and will be relocated to Molesworth Street in 2013.

“The redevelopment of the Molesworth Street building creates a fantastic opportunity to showcase Te Tiriti to more people in a newly refurbished public area which will give further access and insight for visitors,” says Mr Tremain

“Alongside the move, I am overseeing a name change for the Molesworth Street building. This is to reflect its new role as a home for Archives New Zealand’s key government documents and national treasures, as well as being the home of the National Library.

“The new constitution suite provides a single shared site where important documents of nationhood from both institutions can be showcased to the public, such as the Treaty of Waitangi, The Declaration of Independence and the 1893 Women’s Suffrage Petition.”

Mr Tremain says the decision follows consultation with mana whenua, Taranaki Whānui ki Te Upoko o Te Ika iwi, who are supportive, and was signalled last year by former Internal Affairs Minister, Nathan Guy.

“The Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document and its physical move, safekeeping and preservation will be very carefully managed.

“In 2011, the National Library and Archives New Zealand were integrated into the Department of Internal Affairs. This new shared space is an example of the benefits of government organisations combining back office functions while delivering better frontline services for the public.”

A timeline of the history of the Treaty of Waitangi includes its various locations, and is available on the Archives New Zealand website.

 

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