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5 comments:

  1. Pauline, 12. November 2012, 11:53

    Thank you Historic Places Wellington for your research. I have since read the Council Heritage Buildings report and under “Description” it says “The construction technique used in the building was modern – a steel framework and foundations of reinforced concrete. The exterior walls are 330mm brick, plastered and the interior walls are brick or reinforced concrete.” From this report there appears to be no valid justification for the demolition and there should be an independent engineering report; plans need to be fully investigated to retain at least the essential elements of this building which has survived a number of earthquakes over the last 84 years.

    The suggestion of a Boutique hotel sounds great not a 25 storey office block.

     
  2. George, 12. November 2012, 20:32

    We all know demolition is a done deal. Wellington is property developers’ heaven.

     
  3. Phil C, 16. November 2012, 0:54

    Ohh no, no, no! How can they let this happen? Why are some New Zealanders so set on vulgarising and vandalising their country?

    Mind you, Wellingtonians have a wonderful history of wrecking their architectural heritage, as in the 1980s. You’d think the presence of a university and a civil service might serve to heighten sensibilities but no, it’s a town that seems to want to render itself ever-more provincial and parochial in the pursuit of passing fads.

     
  4. Maximus, 16. November 2012, 15:51

    photos on this page by eyeofthefish.org …..

     
  5. Tania W, 17. November 2012, 11:01

    Thanks Wellington.Scoop for highlighting this issue. Every day, it seems another heritage building is under threat, with little comment from those living in the city. This is despite the fact that it is the character of our city which makes it such a wonderful place to live in. Whilst it is obvious that safety must be of primary concern for people, this does not need to come at the expense of our heritage. No one is interested in finding creative solutions to the issue and the knee-jerk reaction of demolition will be one we live to regret.

     

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