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Problems with temporary block wall on Paraparaumu beach

Press Release – Kapiti Coast District Council
Kāpiti Coast District Council will be monitoring a temporary block wall at the south end of Paraparaumu Beach over the weekend.

A 170-metre concrete structure was installed to provide temporary protection for a sewer main serving a number of properties on Wharemauku Road following a significant storm in Kāpiti in August.

A reasonable portion of the blocks along the central section of the wall have recently rotated towards the sea.

Kāpiti Coast District Council Group Manager Infrastructure Services Sean Mallon says the Council’s staff, contractors and engineering consultations have assessed the situation and found the wall is in no immediate danger of collapsing.

“We are planning on doing a further assessment of Monday to determine the extent of any repairs or remedial works required,” he says.

“In the meantime, we’re installing barriers and signage alerting the public to the potential instability of the concrete blocks and restricting access along the reserve area behind the wall.

“We will continue monitoring the situation over the weekend.”

DESIGN OF NEW PAEKĀKĀRIKI SEAWALL PROGRESSING

Paekākāriki residents had an opportunity to see how the design of their new seawall was progressing last Sunday. The current seawall has been in place for 38 years and no longer effectively protects The Parade behind it, as highlighted by the recent heavy seas that damaged a section of the wall and caused part of the road to crumble away.

Residents, who were consulted over engineering, ecological, amenity and social aspects of the concept design of the new seawall with the community board and a community design group several years ago, were updated on how the detailed design is developing at a meeting with Council staff.

When the detailed design of the new seawall has been finalised and endorsed by the Community Board, a tender will go out for its construction mid-year with works to start several months later.

The seawall, expected to be completed by mid-2019, will be a combination of concrete, timber and rock with a walk/cycleway at the top and upgraded accessways at regular intervals along it.

Deputy Mayor and Ward Councillor for Paekākāriki, Janet Holborow, says having the community so involved in the project has ensured residents’ values have been integrated into the design of the new structure.

“Residents will be able to look at the final detailed design before construction starts later this year and provide feedback on potential public art and planting along the seawall,” she says.

Resource consent for the seawall was granted by the Greater Wellington Regional Council in May 2016.

This project was one of six identified as a priority for the district in the long term plan 2015-35.

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