Record numbers of doctors and nurses in Wellington hospitals, says Minister

News from NZ Government
A record number of doctors and nurses are taking care of patients in Capital and Coast DHB.

As of 31 March, there were over 650 doctor full-time equivalents and almost 1,700 nurse full-time equivalents employed by Capital and Coast DHB. That’s over 170 more doctors and over 410 more nurses compared to 2008.

“Our dedicated health workforce is making a difference to the lives of patients in Wellington. More doctors and nurses means faster treatment and better experiences for patients and their families,” says Health Minister Dr Jonathan Coleman.

Nationally, there were almost 8,200 doctor full-time equivalents and nearly 23,000 nurse full-time equivalents employed by DHBs.

The number of doctors and nurses working in the public health system has increased by over 6,900 since 2008, an increase of over 28 per cent. This includes over 1,220 more senior doctors, an increase of almost 45 per cent, and over 1,210 more senior nurses, an increase of over 45 per cent.

“Recently I welcomed the Health and Independence report which shows that overall, the health and disability system performs well for most New Zealanders.

“However, the report outlines the challenges facing the sector, such as an ageing population.

“The New Zealand Health Strategy positions the health sector to respond to the changing and ageing nature of our population and works to ensure that the health workforce is well equipped to handle current and future demands.

The health workforce is supported by the extra $568 million being invested into the health sector this year – the biggest single increase in seven years – taking the health budget to a record $16.1 billion in 2016/17.”

News from NZ Government
Health Minister Jonathan Coleman says a record number of doctors and nurses are taking care of patients in Hutt Valley DHB.

As of 31 March 2017 there were over 250 doctor full-time equivalents and over 660 nurse full-time equivalents employed by Hutt Valley. That’s over 70 more doctors and over 70 more nurses compared to 2008.

Nationally, there were almost 8,200 doctor full-time equivalents and nearly 23,000 nurse full-time equivalents employed by DHBs.

The number of doctors and nurses working in our public health system has increased by over 6,900 since 2008, an increase of over 28 per cent. This includes over 1,220 more senior doctors, an increase of almost 45 per cent, and over 1,210 more senior nurses, an increase of over 45 per cent.

“Our dedicated health workforce is making a difference to the lives of patients in the Hutt Valley. More doctors and nurses means faster treatment and better experiences for patients and their families,” says Dr Coleman.

“Recently I welcomed the Health and Independence report which shows that overall, the health and disability system performs well for most New Zealanders.

“However, the report outlines the challenges facing the sector, such as an ageing population.

“The New Zealand Health Strategy positions the health sector to respond to the changing and ageing nature of our population and works to ensure that the health workforce is well equipped to handle current and future demands.

The health workforce is supported by the extra $568 million being invested into the health sector this year – the biggest single increase in seven years – taking the health budget to a record $16.1 billion in 2016/17.”

A copy of the latest health workforce report is available on the Ministry of Health’s website, www.health.govt.nz.

 

1 comment:

  1. Lola Ester, 10. May 2017, 7:19

    ” Full time equivalents” are not doctors. What a spin on a failed health system. Our hospitals are run by accountants and bureaucrats.If hospitals were run by the wise health experts (many speaking out have been vilified) the health system they would create would be vastly different and would not be failing.

     

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