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National Library sending 600,000 books to the Philippines to be digitised

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The National Library has announced plans to give away up to 600,000 books from its overseas-published collections – the books are to be sent to a digitisation centre which the DomPost reports is in the Philippines. After the books have been digitised, they will then be sent to a storage centre in the United States, which will be paying for all transport and digitisation costs. The National Library says the books will become available online “within two years of receipt.”

News from Dept of Internal Affairs
Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa National Library has reached an historic agreement with Internet Archive. All books left at the end of the Overseas Published Collections (OPC) review process will be donated to Internet Archive, so they can digitise and preserve them, ensuring future access for New Zealanders.

National Librarian Te Pouhuaki Rachel Esson says the National Library has listened to the views of the public and staff who were concerned about losing access to the knowledge contained in the books.

“These books will now be part of a global digital library, going from being very rarely accessed and used, to providing universal access to this knowledge from anywhere and at any time.

“When the project to review these overseas books first began mid-2018 it appeared possible that books we chose not to keep, and that other libraries didn’t want, could face secure destruction. This agreement will not only ensure ongoing access to these books, but also ensure they are preserved.

“It is part of the National Library’s mission to remove barriers to knowledge, ensure New Zealanders have the skills to create knowledge and preserve knowledge for future generations. The average date of publication for these overseas books is between 1965 and 1969. With most of them out of print, digitisation is a key way forward with this important mahi,” says Ms Esson.

Books from the OPC that fit within the National Library’s collecting priorities, as set out in the 2015 Collections Policy and Collecting Plan, will be retained. Some books are being transferred to libraries in the New Zealand, Pacific and global library networks and continue to be accessible via interloan.

Books remaining for deselection at the end of the current review will be sent to an Internet Archive digitisation facility. Permission to export the collection from the OPC has been granted by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage under the Protected Objects Act 1975.

Following digitisation, the books will be transferred to Internet Archive’s physical archive facility in the United States for long-term storage and preservation. The Internet Archive is paying for packaging, transport and digitisation.

“This donation from the National Library of New Zealand will expand our library’s collection in meaningful ways,” says Brewster Kahle, Internet Archive founder.

“Given the age of these books, the Internet Archive is unlikely to receive them from other sources, so this is a real opportunity to preserve the books and make them available for digital learners all over the world to borrow online. In this way, the National Library of New Zealand is contributing to the world’s digital future at a time it is most needed,” says Mr Kahle.

Internet Archive will make digitised copies of the books publicly available through its Open Library Service in two years using Controlled Digital Lending, which means each title may be borrowed by one person at a time. The Internet Archive has agreed to remove any OPC material from its Open Library Service at the request of any rights holders and have a takedown policy.

In addition, says Ms Esson, “I have asked that authors be given the opportunity to opt-out before the donation process. Authors will be given the opportunity to check the next set of book lists released to libraries. Authors can request that specific items, for which they hold rights, are not sent to Internet Archive.”

News from National Library of NZ
National Library Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa has listened to the views of the public and worked hard to support New Zealanders’ ongoing access to books from the Overseas Published Collections.

We have reached agreement with Internet Archive to donate books that are removed from the Overseas Published Collections (OPC) for digitisation, which will ensure free future online access for New Zealanders.

Internet Archive is an internationally reputed, non-profit organisation building a global digital library with a mission to provide universal access to all knowledge.

When the project first began mid-2018 it appeared likely that books remaining at the end of the review process would face secure destruction. We are pleased to have secured the future of these titles.

Books from the OPC that fit within the National Library’s collecting priorities, as set out in the 2015 Collections Policy and Collecting Plan, will be retained by the National Library. Books remaining for deselection at the end of the review process will be donated to Internet Archive for export to their digitisation facility.

Permission to export the collection from the OPC has been granted by Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage under the Protected Objects Act 1975.

Internet Archive has agreed to make digitised copies of the books publicly available through its Open Library Service using Controlled Digital Lending within two years of receipt.

Controlled Digital Lending is the way of limiting lending within current copyright law. You can find out more about Controlled Digital Lending on the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) website.

We engaged with the Chief Executive of Copyright Licensing New Zealand and the Chair of WeCreate and their advice informed the arrangement with Internet Archive. The agreement explicitly provides for the removal of any OPC material from its Open Library Service at the request of the rightsholder of any item.

In addition, I have asked that authors be given the opportunity to opt-out before the donation process. Authors will be given the opportunity to check the next set of book lists released to libraries. Authors can request that specific items, for which they hold rights, are not sent to Internet Archive

Following digitisation, the books will be transferred to Internet Archive’s physical archive facility in the United States for long-term storage and preservation.

The interlibrary loan system enables access to physical copies of these book titles through your public library.

Books from the OPC that fit within the National Library’s collecting priorities, as set out in the 2015 Collections Policy and Collecting Plan, will be retained.

With stakeholders notified, the National Library can resume the review process. We will engage with the library sector and peak bodies to agree how best to proceed.

Open Library Service
International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions
What we are doing with the Overseas Published Collections

We are rehoming some of the books from our Overseas Published Collections, which are part of our General Collection. This is so we can make room to grow our Māori, Pacific and New Zealand collections and we can continue to build well-managed coherent collections that support the National Library’s functions.

The National Library signalled this review process in 2015 when the collection policy was widely consulted with the whole of New Zealand’s library sector. Successive Ministers have supported this work and the National Library has briefed our current Minister on the progress and next steps.

As required by the National Library of New Zealand (Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa) Act 2003, Ministerial approval had been given for the removal of these books from the National Library.

The Overseas Published Collections project is supported by the library sector including the Council of New Zealand University Librarians (CONZUL), Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa (LIANZA) and the Library Information Advisory Committee (LIAC), which advises the Minister of Internal Affairs.

To date, we’ve received requests for just over 10,000 of the books from other libraries in the New Zealand and wider Library network, applying our Principles for retention or deselection of the overseas published collections held by the National Library of New Zealand 2019 criteria. We’ve distributed 3,000 of them and are working to get the rest to their new homes.

About 50 percent of the Overseas Published Collections titles have been reviewed with input from our stakeholders, including librarians, bibliophiles, students and researchers.

By applying principle one, some books have been transferred to the Alexander Turnbull Library’s research collections. Additionally, a more focused collection of overseas publications will be retained in the National Library’s General Collections.

Requests for books have come from:

university libraries
national libraries
public libraries
government department libraries
law libraries, and
special libraries, such as the Lesbian & Gay Archives of New Zealand, and the Catholic Diocese of Auckland Library.

I am pleased that these books will be able to strengthen existing collections in organisations where there is an associated community of interest. These books remain accessible to researchers, and the public, through the interloan system.

Principles for retention or deselection of the Overseas Published Collections

The Principles for retention or deselection of the Overseas Published Collections held by the National Library of New Zealand 2019 document has been created to ensure that due diligence has been applied to the distribution of the Overseas Published Collections.

The document provides visibility to National Library stakeholders and staff directly involved on the distribution/process work and any other interested parties, on the principles to be applied when distributing the Overseas Published Collections.

As this collection has not been reviewed for many years, this exercise is a significant undertaking and principles have been developed to ensure that the publications that are out of scope for remaining in the collection are handled in an appropriate manner.

Following Principle One, our process is to first offer deselected books to New Zealand and Pacific libraries, then to other organisations and lastly to individuals.

National Library book collecting

In 2019, more than 167,000 published items were acquired for the collections of the National Library. More than 81,000 of these were New Zealand or Pacific items that are physically stored in National Library, Wellington. These acquisitions include newly published items and older items added to the collections through donations from individuals, groups or other libraries.

6 comments:

  1. Michael, 13. July 2021, 11:03

    This is appalling news indeed. Many of these books are in copyright and cannot be digitised. Why should the onus on enforcing the law be on the creator of work? It’s unbelievable that a national library would participate in illegal scanning activities.

    Scanning books and keeping them online adds significantly to Co2 emissions, due to the power required to power the servers, the same now as from global aviation emissions.

    Has the library abandoned its “rehoming” policy? why this sudden policy swing? Why is the library not listening to all those who have pleaded for the books to remain in the National Library? Instead they are being exported, forever. What will happen to those books which the rights owner asks not be sent overseas? Will they remain in the library? This is not explained. We must not allow this appalling action to proceed.

     
  2. Dr Helen Heath, 13. July 2021, 16:15

    This is an excellent outcome for researchers. These mostly out of print titles are going from rarely used or accessed to becoming available to all at no cost to the NZ taxpayer. And using controlled digital lending protects authors. Win-win. [via twitter]

     
  3. Fergus Barrowman, 13. July 2021, 22:32

    This is the outfit who were caught pirating Elizabeth Knox and a bunch of others in 2018? And remember the Fairfax photo archive catastrophe? Shipping our stuff offshore for scanning and “preservation” is a really bad idea. [via twitter]

     
  4. Mike, 14. July 2021, 16:51

    “What the Internet Archive is doing is no different than heaving a brick through a grocery store window and handing out the food — and then congratulating yourself for providing a public service.” – Association of American Publishers, 2021

    Why is the National Library complicit in giving away authors’ works for free?

     
  5. Daniel, 14. July 2021, 17:52

    The activity that quote refers to is more analogous to a food bank, not a grocery store. The publisher in this situation prefers to be the supermarket that purposefully spoils food when it comes off the shelf en route to the bin.

     
  6. Mike, 14. July 2021, 21:55

    It is not a win-win for anyone. It is a loss for authors and publishers. The taxpayer loses when the legal suits come in against the New Zealand government for complicity in illegal activities. And researchers lose because our books have left our National Library. A terrible outcome that the NZ Society of Authors and PANZ have rightly called illegal and unethical.